Tag Archives: Tides of Change

Complete Graveyard Shift

Just ran a very enjoyable session of Edge of the Empire for a group of great players (most of whom I’ve not had the pleasure of gaming with before), the session was titled ‘Graveyard Shift’ and focussed on a group of smugglers who had been hired to take some colonists on a pilgrimage to the Alderaanian system. I’ll be putting up a post shortly discussing how I thought the game went, but until then here is the complete list of videos connected with the game. Continue reading Complete Graveyard Shift

Different coloured R2 units

One of the players is going to be an R2 unit in my forthcoming Adventures on the Outer Rim one-shot, I’ve always loved how there are lots of different colour schemes for R2s and so I’ve come up with some messing about in Photoshop.

You can find a link to the PNG file (with transparent background) here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByVpAo4rxDGuNTdMcGFUVE5xQ1E/view?usp=sharing

 

What is Adventures on the Outer Rim?

Adventures on the Outer Rim is the umbrella term that I’m using to refer to the loosely linked series of trilogies and one-shots for the FFG Star Wars RPGs that I’m going to be running over the next year and possibly beyond. When I first signed on with the Tides of Change FB group, a community dedicated to running Star Wars games Continue reading What is Adventures on the Outer Rim?

Heart of the Empire

I thought that I’d put a post up today to give a shoutout to an excellent game I’m playing in at the moment, the ‘Heart of the Empire’ game GMed by Michael Lashambe, it’s a Star Wars game (run under the auspices of the Tides of Change group) using the Age of Rebellion rules from Fantasy Flight Games. In it we play a motley cell of rebels who had just arrived on the Hoth garrison shortly before the famous Imperial attack (as seen in the movie Star Wars: Episode V The Empire Strikes Back), without any idea of where the rebel fleet was meeting, we stolen a Lambda class shuttle and fled the system, heading to the nearest rebel base that we knew of.

Continue reading Heart of the Empire

Why I love droids in FFGs Star Wars games

When you make a character in one of the FFG Star Wars games (Edge of the Empire, Age of Rebellion or Force and Destiny) you receive a baseline of characteristics determined by your race and than an amount of experience points to spend on improving characteristics, buying specialisations and other such things. Droids start off with all of their characteristics at one and you have to spend to buy them up whereas other races generally have some slightly higher scores in that species area of expertise. I’ve seen a few forum posts decrying the droid build saying that you can only be as good as a non-droid character in a relatively narrow area of expertise, TBH I have no idea if this is true or not since my own choice of droids as a species has nothing whatsoever to do with the characteristics that you get. Continue reading Why I love droids in FFGs Star Wars games

Vader’s on his Way

In a couple of weeks I’m going to be running the first session of an Edge of the Empire Star Wars game called Spirit of the Force, the game is going to be a trilogy, three sessions which cover a single plot arc, continuing the adventures of the characters from my previous (looser) Terror on the Outer Rim campaign. Continue reading Vader’s on his Way

Episode X of our Star Wars Campaign

This evening we’re running the tenth episode of our Star Wars campaign Terror on the Outer Rim; our heroes are trapped on the planetary stronghold of the insane Garruda the Hutt, pursued by his droid minions. Can they disable his powerful shield generators, allowing the Bandit Queen to take out the aged Hutt once and for all? Continue reading Episode X of our Star Wars Campaign

Some things that the Force Awakens reminded me of

Please note that there will not be any movie spoilers within this post, however, I am going to be discussing emotions and ideas evoked by the film, so if you’re super spoiler sensitive you might want to give this post a miss until you’ve seen the film. Continue reading Some things that the Force Awakens reminded me of

Committing to a System

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about why I find certain new systems a little difficult to get into, it takes me a while to pick them up, whilst some older systems (like the OWOD system) are very firmly lodged in my mind; now this might not seem like much of a problem but it can be frustrating, since you tend to hit that point of fully understanding and mastering a new system fairly near the end of a campaign (or at least I do). As someone who hasn’t really tended to run a lot of consecutive games using the same system, by the time I swing around to running the same system again I normally have to brush up on the rules again, whereas with OWOD I went through a period in my student days where I was running and playing in many different games all using that system, so I really had a chance to get into it and learn how it worked.

So why am I rambling about this? Well I’m currently running a Star Wars campaign (you can see the videos of that by clicking here), I’m loving the system but, like most games it takes a little bit of mastering; myself and my players are starting to use the intricacies of the system a little more (we are running session 8 of the game in a couple of weeks), but again I fear we’re only going to hit that sweet spot where we’re all up to speed and really comfortable with the system a little further down the line. This seems a shame, and so I’ve decided that, rather than my normal behaviour, running a single game using the system and then moving on to something else, that when my current Edge of the Empire campaign game finishes (although that won’t be for some time yet) I’m going to follow it by running another Star Wars game. I may decide to run Age of Rebellion or Force and Destiny instead of Edge of Empire since these games use the same rules system, but I definitely want to master the system more.

Positive/Negative Language

This is not something I’ve thought about a lot on a conscious level until recently; generally whenever I am trying to sell my players on the virtues of a new system I prefer to point out the positives of adopting the new system rather than the negatives of the old. I’ve never consciously made that as a decision, it just always seemed like a logical thing to do; for example, recently I approached my group about bring our Star Wars campaign under the umbrella of the Tides of Change Star Wars RP club.

For those of you who may not be aware, Tides of Change is a roleplay club where GMs run a series of loosely linked campaigns using the Fantasy Flight Games Star Wars RPG; GMs share rumours between games creating the feel of a larger universe, it also uses an innovative mechanic where in each game Tide Changes (plot twists) are proposed and the members of the club then vote on them in a facebook poll. The one with the most votes becomes the twist that occurs in the game.

Tides of Changes is chaired by Andre Martinez.

I didn’t want to spring such a change on my players so we had a series of votes in our campaign facebook group and discussions about what moving our campaign into Tides of Change would mean; I pointed out the positives of this, some of which included:

  • Being part of a larger game universe.
  • Use of the very interesting variant mechanics proposed by the group.
  • Support from a larger community.
  • Exposure to a wider audience.

At no point did I cast any aspersions on our current way of running things or say that there was anything wrong with our current method of gaming, partly because there wasn’t, but also I find that if you tend to portray things with a focus on the negative then people tend to respond negatively to them, whereas if you point out the positives then their reaction often (not always) mirrors this approach.

Contrast for instance if someone comes up to you at work and says “you’re doing this wrong”, you’re more likely to respond negatively in a knee-jerk fashion than if someone says “it might be better if you do this.”

I actively noticed this recently on a LARP Facebook group I belong to where people were setting out guidelines/dos and don’ts for the event, and I as I read them I noticed that I was becoming progressively more disenchanted with the idea of actually attending; I realised as I went through that this was due in part to the negative language being used, everything was “don’t do this” and “don’t do that”, the assumption seeming to be that people would behave like idiots, and this rankled me somewhat (although I am aware their are idiots out there).

It’s definitely something worth keeping in mind though whenever you’re trying to sell players a new game or campaign setting, focus on the positive points of whatever you’re trying to get across to them rather than the negatives of other things.