Wild West Wizardry Prep Notes

By | 24th June 2018

Last night I ran a game of Dresden Files Accelerated for five great players, it was a one-shot and–to put a bit of a twist on it–I’d decided to set the game in the wild west rather than the more traditional modern setting of the game. Looking for an iconic town I settled on Tombstone, during it’s waning years after the silver mines had dried up:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombstone,_Arizona

Using the Wikipedia page I made the following notes:

POTTED TOMBSTONE HISTORY

  • Founded in 1979 by Prospector Ed Schiefflin in Arizona.
  • Grew in mid-1880s, last of the boom towns.
  • Local mines produced $40 to $85 million silver bullion.
  • Town established on mesa above the Goodenough Mine.

  • Had bowling alley, 4 churches, ice house, school, 2 banks,
    3 newspapers and an ice cream parlour.

  • 110 saloons.
  • 14 gambling halls, numerous dance halls and brothels.
  • All businesses situated amongst and around silver mines.

  • In mid-1880s the silver mines pentrated the water table.

  • Pumps were destroyed by a fire in 1886.
  • Unprofitable to re-build the costly pumps.
  • City nearby became something of a ghost town.

The players were told about the setting in advance and asked to create characters using the DFAE rules, shortly before the game I posted the following plot-clue to the Facebook event:

Created using an online tool: https://www.fodey.com/generators/newspaper/snippet.asp

To give you an idea of my prep, below are some of the notes that I made for and during the game.

First of all I started with the main antagonists, a black court vampire by the name of Dillon and his thrall, a young girl with powers of necromancy.

Then I moved onto some of the goon-level flunkies who were going to be acting as muscle for our main villain:

I also made some brief notes of the powers and abilities that these villains had to save me having to look them up during the session:

During the session I also made some notes regarding PC names and incidental NPCs, I also used these index card to keep track of boosts, advantages, etc.

In addition to these note I had a text file with some rough plot ideas outlined, just before we started recording I asked the players for a bit of background and worked to incorporate it into the draft plot that I had written down already, changing it as necessary. The index card method is really useful during a game because it allows me to quickly reference the most needed stats and information without having to flip through the rulebook so much.

If you want to watch the actual play video of the session you can find it here:

 

2 thoughts on “Wild West Wizardry Prep Notes

  1. John Drury

    Great session.

    Interestingly, there were a couple of surprises for me that played against my expectations for a Dresden game: I was pretty sure Ruby was a White Court Vampire until I was able to investigate further, and I was certain the master Black Court Vampire was the one behind the necromancy. Those were good turns that really made me alter O’Connor’s responses to those situations!

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