Random Things that might be celebrated in a village

These random things articles are designed as quick idea generators for time-pressed GMs who want to inject some additional details into their game, when you need some inspiration just roll a D20 and consult the table:

No.Description
1A group of locals equipped with primitive noise-makers have gathered infront of the dwelling of someone believed guilty of a crime, they bang their pots and make a racket well into the evening to embarrass the miscreant.
2A solemn procession carries an empty coffin to each place of worship in the area, the coffin is then buried at the final destination. It is believed that any lost souls will be drawn to the coffin and will be buried along with it so that they know peace and do not menace the living.
3The village holds a mock-court for anyone who has been married for more than 7 years, if that person solemnly testifies under oath that they have never had a cross word with their spouse then they are awarded with a side of bacon or other local produce.
4Locals dress in brightly coloured costumes and dance around an icon of the local fertility god in the hope that they will be bestowed with a bountiful harvest.
5The local shepherds gather all of their sheep together and bring them into the village for shearing.
6Chalk outline drawings etched into the local landscape are cleared of weeds and renewed as part of a day long festival.
7Locals compete to be the quickest to eat a large onion or other foul smelling vegetable, it is believed that the person who wins will be blessed with good luck in the coming year.
8A large wheel of cheese or other suitable produce is rolled down a steep incline, the locals attempt to race the cheese down to the bottom of the hill. These races have been known to lead to many injuries, but the scars from the race are shown off proudly by the locals.
9Locals compete to throw their old shoes the furthest. The winner is awarded a pair of new boots from a local cobbler and it is believed that goods news will travel to them within the next few months.
10The townsfolk throw small items representing their hopes and dreams into a local river or well. It is believed that by doing so they bring these things to them in the coming year.
11A wooden rowing boat is carried through the streets by the locals, at the end of the ceremony it is decorated and then set on fire. It is believed this blesses the fishermen and others who make their living at sea.
12A barrel is filled with burning sticks and rolled down the main street of the village. Good fortune is said to visit anyone who can pluck one of the burning brands from the barrel as it rolls past.
13Villagers compete in a gurning (face-pulling) competition with the winner being the person who can pull the most grotesque face. The winner is then expected to caper round the outskirts of the village warding off evil with his horrible appearance.
14An effigy of a local god is burnt as an offering along with produce associated with them.
15A local man and woman are elected King and Queen for a day at the end of a weekend festival, there are given special privilieges and are treated as celebrities for the following year until a new King and Queen are elected.
16In order to pray for a good harvest a local man or woman dresses themselves in straw and goes from house to house and dances for the entertainment of the locals, he or she is rewarded with beer.
17A number of birds are captured and released, the pattern and direction that the birds fly in is read as an omen by the local wise people.
18Locals enact a small morality play showing the triumph of good over evil, or depicting a scene from the villages past.
19Village children run around the village and are rewarded with a bun or other baked goods. This race is thought to bless the village with the energy of the young.
20Vegetables are carved into leering faces, hollowed out and candles placed inside them. The lanterns are placed on the threshold of properties to ward off evil.

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